Connect with us

FACEBOOK

Delay, deny, deflect: the Facebook school of crisis management

Published

on

A new book by two New York Times journalists about recent events at Facebook reveals a lot about how the social-media giant operates and its bid for market dominance

In their new book An Ugly Truth: Inside Facebook’s Battle for Domination, two New York Times journalists pull off the difficult feat of telling a story many of us feel we already know, in such a way that we quickly discover just how much we don’t know.

The award-winning writers both cover technology for the paper, but bring different areas of expertise to the book. Cecilia Kang, based in Washington DC, covers the business end of technology, with a focus on regulatory policy, while Sheera Frenkel, out in San Francisco, covers the technical side of technology, with an expertise in cybersecurity.

The book arose out of an investigative story that ran in the New York Times in November 2018, “Delay, Deny, and Deflect: How Facebook’s Leaders Fought Through Crisis”. The explosive, detailed piece focused on the company’s clumsy leadership stumbles and questionable handling of a succession of crises, including the Russian misinformation campaign on the platform ahead of the 2016 presidential election, and the Cambridge Analytica data breach scandal.

“During that time, we had such a good partnership,” says Frenkel. “I was in San Francisco, in the Bay Area, Cecilia was in Washington. Our sources and our interests really complemented each other. We left so much in our notebooks, so much that we didn’t get to include in the article that we thought would be really fascinating for readers.

“You know, in an article you can say, for instance, that a meeting happened, but you can’t give the nuance of what different people in the room thought and how it was so warm that the person giving a presentation was sweating; all the kind of colourful detail that makes the scene come alive.”

Advertisement
free widgets for website
Cecilia Kang and Sheera Frenkel are award-winning writers who both cover technology for the New York Times. Photograph: Beowulf Sheehan
Cecilia Kang and Sheera Frenkel are award-winning writers who both cover technology for the New York Times. Photograph: Beowulf Sheehan

Frenkel says the writing process “was just very collaborative”, much of it a long-distance process between opposite coasts during a pandemic.

“I think there were certain chapters where it was very clear that it was going to rely more on Cecilia’s sources, or my sources. And so that person would take the lead in writing that particular chapter. And then there were a lot of other chapters that were a mix of the two of us. I honestly think it helped that neither one of us really had an ego. This was done in a very collaborative way, where we both wanted to elevate each other’s work.”

Colourful details abound in An Ugly Truth, granting it a driving narrative force that propels a reader through a story whose basic outline is already known from years of headline stories, political hearings and, of course, the counter-campaigning by Facebook. It’s full of the kind of vivid specificity that comes directly from high-level sources, from people who fidgeted in the executive meeting rooms during tense and angry sessions that without doubt, generated plenty of sweat, and not just from the heat of a room.

“We knew that there was more to say thematically, as well as to connect the dots between all the things that we were learning in our reporting on certain episodes and scenes,” says Kang. “We really wanted to explore the business model as well as the technologies and how those two things are so core to understanding Facebook beyond just the episodic news stories that we were writing, on scandal after scandal after scandal. And we also really wanted to do a deep exploration of the leadership.”

The goal was to produce a book that wouldn’t be just news, “but an education as well”, Kang says. “I think people are a little bit bored or jaded by one scandal after another. This is why it was so important for us to explain and show how the creation of the business model, and the technologies that amplify content, are such core problems.”

See also  Activate this “hidden” Facebook security feature right now to prevent hackers from taking over your ...

And to forefront the “wash, rinse and repeat cycle” of problem management – Facebook’s strategy of delay, deny, deflect.

Advertisement
free widgets for website

An Ugly Truth is centred on Facebook’s actions, reactions, and, far too often, failure to act at all in the period spanning the last two US presidential elections, from 2016 to 2021. The writers show convincingly how decisions taken about the core technologies behind the platform meld with business decisions to create a destructive but highly profit-maximising mix.

That speech violated the company’s hate-speech policies. But Facebook decided to give him an exemption

Algorithms designed to promote a user’s engagement with the platform also boost outrage, disinformation and conspiracy theories – and then swiftly suggest other similar pages. As Russian operatives quickly discovered in the 2016 election, the system is easy to game and exploit.

The Trumpian span of the book isn’t accidental. “Donald Trump surfaced a lot of those problems to the broader public,” says Kang.

One of the first troublesome events highlighted in An Ugly Truth is Facebook’s response to Trump’s campaign speech in which he promised to ban Muslims from entering the US. “That speech violated the company’s hate-speech policies. But Facebook decided to give him an exemption. And that set off a chain reaction” that culminated in Facebook’s deeply controversial “newsworthy speech” exemption that allowed political figures to say anything, even lie outright, without threat of having their post or videos removed.

http://www.google.com/

At the close of the book, Trump’s use of the platform to wrongly insist he’d won the 2020 election, and to goad supporters to show up to the national capitol on January 6th, creates yet another internal Facebook crisis. Despite warnings from Facebook’s security experts that some users were expressing alarming intentions to gather in Washington on the day, Facebook executives decide not to notify chief executive Mark Zuckerberg in case the media got wind.

Likewise, the book argues, Facebook failed to act on its security team’s growing concern about Russian activity on the platform before the presidential election, because notifying US authorities might bring unwanted scrutiny and attention.

Advertisement
free widgets for website

“[Facebook] made a lot of decisions based on Trump and his posts and his activity on the social network,” Kang says. Trump himself became “a massive priority”, draining attention away from the very problems on the platform that his activities forefronted, depriving them of needed resources, thoughtful policy and decisive action.

The book shows how concerns and criticisms are regularly ignored or suppressed, whether raised by top management or employees at Facebook’s regular “all hands” open meetings with Zuckerberg.

“Facebook really prides itself on what it thinks is internal transparency,” says Frenkel. And yet, when its leaders are confronted by employees, “they often deflect, they give PR lines, they don’t really engage with a lot of the criticism or really internalise the criticism. And so it’s one thing to tell your employees, ‘we want to hear from you’. And another thing to actually listen when employees speak.”

A lot of Facebook’s problems stem from the separation between the policy and tech sides of the company

Senior employees don’t seem to listen to each other, either. Frenkel says that since the book was published in July, she and Kang had heard back from sources who had been in the same meetings, yet were surprised to learn from the book what others had been thinking.

“I think a lot of Facebook’s problems stem from the separation between the policy and tech sides of the company, those two sides of the company not talking to each other, not understanding each other,” says Frenkel. “So often, I was told one thing by one side of the company, Cecilia was told something else by a different side of the company, and we realised, like, ‘oh, these two sides of the company don’t even know that they were in disagreement in this meeting’.”

Advertisement
free widgets for website
Because Mark Zuckerberg controls a majority of voting shares, the board ‘is sort of a paper tiger. It’s very much an advisory board.’ File photograph: Getty
Because Mark Zuckerberg controls a majority of voting shares, the board ‘is sort of a paper tiger. It’s very much an advisory board.’ Photograph: Saul Loeb/AFP via Getty

The most dramatic internal discord in the book, and an ongoing, shaping thread, is the growing disconnect and isolation between Zuckerberg and the woman who was for a long time, the public face of the company, chief operations officer Sheryl Sandberg. Sandberg came to Facebook from Google, where she was the main architect of that company’s lucrative targeted advertising business model.

At Facebook, that basic model could be pumped up even further by utilising all the highly specific data that can be gleaned about each Facebook user, from posts, interactions and even by tracking a user’s activity once they leave the platform and go elsewhere on the web. Sandberg turned Facebook into a cash cow but, according to the book, Zuckerberg became disgruntled with her when she failed to sufficiently rebuff criticisms and fend off inquiries.

“We were always interested in [Sandberg] because in many ways she was the face of many of Facebook’s decisions. She had put herself out there in the media defending a lot of their decisions, even before the start of Russian election interference in 2016,” says Frenkel. “As Facebook often says, she was the second most powerful person at the company and as the person who ran things like the policy team and the business side, we thought it was really important to look at her.

“And then I really think, as we were reporting this book, and as we realised how her influence has kind of waned, and her voice was not heard on critical decisions, we became more and more interested.”

Nick Clegg is a former leader of the Liberal Democrats in the UK and for five years served as deputy UK prime minister

The company has denied any rift between Zuckerberg and Sandberg, but anyone following the company closely will have noticed that the go-to person now for comment and explanation is – perhaps disconcertingly for those on this side of the Atlantic – one Nick Clegg, Facebook’s vice-president for global affairs and communications since 2018. Clegg is a former leader of the Liberal Democrats in the UK and for five years served as deputy UK prime minister.

“He is taking over more of her responsibilities,” notes Kang, who co-wrote a profile of Clegg for the New York Times a few months ago. “He is ambitious. He really sees the future of politics, global governance, being at the intersection with technology. It’s a really good position for him to be in, to be at the tip of the spear on that at Facebook. I think that this is a very shrewd move on his part to take this kind of job because at Facebook, their biggest challenges will be navigating the political waters globally. Issues that make for such a ripe kind of portfolio for someone like Clegg, who actually likes that kind of stuff.”

Advertisement
free widgets for website

Zuckerberg seems to trust him too, she adds. “Nick Clegg has broken into that inner circle to some extent, so we may see him take on more.”

Interestingly, Kang says wrote written a section about the relationships Facebook was developing with government leaders in Ireland, but it didn’t make it into the book.

In the long line-up of troubling Facebook scandals, does any event particularly stand out?

“The one that stands out right now to me is all the hate speech and organising that occurred before [the insurrection on] January 6th, because it’s so recent,” says Kang. “And their handling of Covid misinformation. Those are both examples of how Facebook’s handling of its own product, which is content and speech, has really led to real life examples of harm, very dramatic harms.”

We went into it thinking we knew a lot about Facebook, and that … they  just can’t seem to get their act together

Her biggest surprise was to realise that episode after episode recounted in the book emerged not out of some haphazard coincidence of timing and misfortune, but rather was the predictable offspring of the marriage between Facebook’s technologies and its business model.

Advertisement
free widgets for website

“I think we went into it thinking we knew a lot about Facebook, and that, like, oh, boy, they just can’t seem to get their act together. They’re not looking around the corner. But they didn’t not only not look around the corner, they created something that would inevitably result in where we are today.”

And don’t expect Facebook’s board to take any meaningful action. Because Zuckerberg controls a majority of the company’s voting shares, the board “is sort of a paper tiger. It’s very much an advisory board.”

Frenkel says “one other thing we tried to show with the book was that ultimately, nothing has really changed. Neither the business model nor the executive C-suite has really changed from the beginning. How can you expect that pattern to shift? If you have the same people making the same types of decisions predicated on the same business model, you are going to probably see yourself repeating mistakes.

“So many people have asked us, ‘Will this bring change? Would you expect [Facebook] to do different?’ Our answer has been well, you know, we haven’t seen them fundamentally change anything.”

But Facebook management might be driven towards change from within. Facebook’s own employees may be the strongest force for a corporate rethink.

Advertisement
free widgets for website

“One thing internally that has changed, and we showed this towards the end [of the book], is employee outreach. I do think that’s very powerful,” says Frenkel. “Because all of these Silicon Valley companies, Facebook, Google, Apple, they all compete for the same talent. And if Facebook’s own employees are getting so riled up that they’re leaving, and more importantly, new recruits are not joining the company because they’d rather work somewhere else?

“Facebook knows that’s really going to end up damaging them in the long run.”

An Ugly Truth: Inside Facebook’s Battle for Domination, by Sheera Frenkel and Cecilia Kang, is published by Bridge Street Press

GO BACK

Error Image

The account details entered are not currently associated with an Irish Times subscription. Please subscribe to sign in to comment.

Advertisement
free widgets for website

Comment Sign In

Screen Name Selection

Hello

Please choose a screen name. This name will appear beside any comments you post. Your screen name should follow the standards set out in our community standards.

Advertisement
free widgets for website

Forgot Password

Please enter your email address so we can send you a link to reset your password.

Sign In

Advertisement
free widgets for website

Read More

Advertisement
free widgets for website
Continue Reading
Advertisement free widgets for website
Click to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.

FACEBOOK

Understanding Authorization Tokens and Access for the WhatsApp Business Platform

Published

on

By

understanding-authorization-tokens-and-access-for-the-whatsapp-business-platform

The WhatsApp Business Platform makes it easy to send WhatsApp messages to your customers and automate replies. Here, we’ll explore authentication using the Cloud API, hosted by Meta.

We’ll start with generating and using a temporary access token and then replace it with a permanent access token. This tutorial assumes you’re building a server-side application and won’t need additional steps to keep your WhatsApp application secrets securely stored.

Managing Access and Authorization Tokens

First, let’s review how to manage authorization tokens and safely access the API.

Prerequisites

Start by making sure you have a developer account on Meta for Developers. You’ll also need WhatsApp installed on a mobile device to send test messages to.

Creating an App

Before you can authenticate, you’ll need an application to authenticate you.

Advertisement
free widgets for website

Once you’re signed in, you see the Meta for Developers App Dashboard. Click Create App to get started.

Next, you’ll need to choose an app type. Choose Business.

After that, enter a display name for your application. If you have a business account to link to your app, select it. If not, don’t worry. The Meta for Developers platform creates a test business account you can use to experiment with the API. When done, click Create App.

Then, you’ll need to add products to your app. Scroll down until you see WhatsApp and click the Set up button:

Finally, choose an existing Meta Business Account or ask the platform to create a new one and click Continue:

Advertisement
free widgets for website

And with that, your app is created and ready to use. You’re automatically directed to the app’s dashboard.

Note that you have a temporary access token. For security reasons, the token expires in less than 24 hours. However, you can use it for now to test accessing the API. Later, we’ll cover how to generate a permanent access token that your server applications can use. Also, note your app’s phone number ID because you’ll need it soon.

See also  What fallout can we expect from the 2019 Facebook leak?

Click the dropdown under the To field, and then click Manage phone number list.

In the popup that appears, enter the phone number of a WhatsApp account to send test messages to.

Then, scroll further down the dashboard page and you’ll see an example curl call that looks similar to this:

Advertisement
free widgets for website
curl -i -X POST https://graph.facebook.com/v13.0//messages -H 'Authorization: Bearer ' -H 'Content-Type: application/json' -d '{ "messaging_product": "whatsapp", "to": "", "type": "template", "template": { "name": "hello_world", "language": { "code": "en_US" } } }'

Note that the Meta for Developers platform inserts your app’s phone number ID and access token instead of the and placeholders shown above. If you have curl installed, paste the command into your terminal and run it. You should receive a “hello world” message in WhatsApp on your test device.

If you’d prefer, you can convert the curl request into an HTTP request in your programming language by simply creating a POST request that sets the Authorization and Content-Type headers as shown above, including the JSON payload in the request body.

Since this post is about authentication, let’s focus on that. Notice that you’ve included your app’s access token in the Authorization header. For any request to the API, you must set the Authorization header to Bearer .

Remember that you must use your token instead of the placeholder. Using bearer tokens will be familiar if you’ve worked with JWT or OAuth2 tokens before. If you’ve never seen one before, a bearer token is essentially a random secret string that you, as the bearer of the token, can present to an API to prove you’re allowed to access it.

Failure to include this header causes the API to return a 401 Unauthorized response code.

Advertisement
free widgets for website

Creating a Permanent Access Token

Knowing that you need to use a bearer token in the Authorization header of an HTTP request is helpful, but it’s not enough. The only access token you’ve seen so far is temporary. Chances are that you want your app to access the API for more than 24 hours, so you need to generate a longer-lasting access token.

Fortunately, the Meta for Developers platform makes this easy. All you need to do is add a System User to your business account to obtain an access token you can use to continue accessing the API. To create a system user, do the following:

  • Go to Business Settings.

  • Select the business account your app is associated with.
  • Below Users, click System Users.
  • Click Add.
  • Name the system user, choose Admin as the user role, and click Create System User.
  • Select the whatsapp_business_messaging permission.
  • Click Generate New Token.
  • Copy and save your token.

Your access token is a random string of letters and numbers. Now, try re-running the earlier request using the token you just created instead of the temporary one:

curl -i -X POST https://graph.facebook.com/v13.0//messages -H 'Authorization: Bearer ' -H 'Content-Type: application/json' -d '{ "messaging_product": "whatsapp", "to": "", "type": "template", "template": { "name": "hello_world", "language": { "code": "en_US" } } }'

Your test device should receive a second hello message sent via the API.

Best Practices for Managing Access Tokens

It’s important to remember that you should never embed an App Access Token in a mobile or desktop application. These tokens are only for use in server-side applications that communicate with the API. Safeguard them the same way you would any other application secrets, like your database credentials, as anyone with your token has access to the API as your business.

If your application runs on a cloud services provider like AWS, Azure, GCP, or others, those platforms have tools to securely store app secrets. Alternatively there are freely-available secret stores like Vault or Conjur. While any of these options may work for you, it’s important to evaluate your options and choose what works best for your setup. At the very least, consider storing access tokens in environment variables and not in a database or a file where they’re easy to find during a data breach.

Advertisement
free widgets for website

Conclusion

In this post, you learned how to create a Meta for Developers app that leverages the WhatsApp Business Platform. You now know how the Cloud API’s bearer access tokens work, how to send an access token using an HTTP authorization header, and what happens if you send an invalid access token. You also understand the importance of keeping your access tokens safe since an access token allows an application to access a business’ WhatsApp messaging capabilities.

Why not try using the Cloud API, hosted by Meta if you’re considering building an app for your business to manage WhatsApp messaging? Now that you know how to obtain and use access tokens, you can use them to access any endpoint in the API.

First seen at developers.facebook.com

Continue Reading

FACEBOOK

Now people can share directly to Instagram Reels from some of their favorite apps

Published

on

By

now-people-can-share-directly-to-instagram-reels-from-some-of-their-favorite-apps

More people are creating, sharing and watching Reels than ever before. We’ve seen the creator community dive deeply into video content – and use it to connect with their communities. We’re running a limited alpha test that lets creators share video content directly from select integrated apps to Instagram Reels. Now, creators won’t be interrupted in their workflow, making it easier for them share share and express themselves on Reels.

“With the shift to video happening across almost all online platforms, our innovative tools and services empower creativity and fuel the creator economy and we are proud to be able to offer a powerful editing tool like Videoleap that allows seamless content creation, while partnering with companies like Meta to make sharing content that much easier.”- Zeev Farbman, CEO and co-founder of Lightricks.

Starting this month, creators can share short videos directly to Instagram Reels from some of their favorite apps, including Videoleap, Reface, Smule, VivaVideo, SNOW, B612, VITA and Zoomerang, with more coming soon. These apps and others also allow direct sharing to Facebook , which is available for any business with a registered Facebook App to use.

We hope to expand this test to more partners in 2023. If you’re interested in being a part of that beta program, please fill out this form and we will keep track of your submission. We do not currently have information to share about general availability of this integration.

Learn more here about sharing Stories and Reels to Facebook and Instagram and start building today.

Advertisement
free widgets for website

FAQs

Q. What is the difference between the Instagram Content Publishing API and Instagram Sharing to Reels?

See also  Facebook Live: The Coronavirus Gender Gap

A: Sharing to Reels is different from the Instagram Content Publishing API, which allows Instagram Business accounts to schedule and publish posts to Instagram from third-party platforms. Sharing to Reels is specifically for mobile apps to display a ‘Share to Reels’ widget. The target audience for the Share to Reels widget is consumers, whereas the Content Publishing API is targeted towards businesses, including third-party publishing platforms such as Hootsuite and Sprout Social that consolidate sharing to social media platforms within their third-party app.

Q: Why is Instagram partnering with other apps?

A: Creators already use a variety of apps to create and edit videos before uploading them to Instagram Reels – now we’re making that experience faster and easier. We are currently doing a small test of an integration with mobile apps that creators know and love, with more coming soon.

Q: How can I share my video from another app to Reels on Instagram?

Advertisement
free widgets for website

A: How it works (Make sure to update the mobile app you’re using to see the new Share to Reels option):

  • Create and edit your video in one of our partner apps
  • Once your video is ready, tap share and then tap the Instagram Reels icon
  • You will enter the Instagram Camera, where you can customize your reel with audio, effects, Voiceover and stickers. Record any additional clips or swipe up to add an additional clip from your camera roll.
  • Tap ‘Next’ to add a caption, hashtag, location, tag others or use the paid partnerships label.
  • Tap ‘Share’. Your reel will be visible where you share reels today, depending on your privacy settings.
See also  We all hate Facebook. So why aren't we deleting our accounts?

Q: How were partners selected?

A. We are currently working with a small group of developers that focus on video creation and editing as early partners. We’ll continue to expand to apps with other types of creation experiences.

Q: When will other developers be able to access Sharing to Reels on Instagram?

A: We do not currently have a date for general availability, but are planning to expand further in 2023.

Q: Can you share to Facebook Reels from other apps?

Advertisement
free widgets for website

A: Yes, Facebook offers the ability for developers to integrate with Sharing to Reels. For more information on third-party sharing opportunities, check out our entire suite of sharing offerings .

First seen at developers.facebook.com

Continue Reading

FACEBOOK

What to know about Presto SQL query engine and PrestoCon

Published

on

By

what-to-know-about-presto-sql-query-engine-and-prestocon

The open source Presto SQL query engine is used by a diverse set of companies to navigate increasingly large data workflows. These companies are using Presto in support of e-commerce, cloud, security and other areas. Not only do many companies use Presto, but individuals from those companies are also active contributors to the Presto open source community.

In support of that community, Presto holds meetups around the world and has an annual conference, PrestoCon, where experts and contributors gather to exchange knowledge. This year’s PrestoCon, hosted by the Linux Foundation, takes place December 7-8 in Mountain View, CA. This blog post will explore some foundational elements of Presto and what to expect at this year’s PrestoCon.

What is Presto?

Presto is a distributed SQL query engine for data platform teams. Presto users can perform interactive queries on data where it lives using ANSI SQL across federated and diverse sources. Query engines allow data scientists and analysts to focus on building dashboards and utilizing BI tools so that data engineers can focus on storage and management, all while communicating through a unified connection layer.

In short, the scientist does not have to consider how or where data is stored, and the engineer does not have to optimize for every use case for the data sources they manage. You can learn more about Presto in a recent ELI5 video below.

Caption: Watch the video by clicking on the image above.

Advertisement
free widgets for website

Presto was developed to solve the problem of petabyte-scale, multi-source data queries taking hours or days to return. These resources and time constraints make real-time analysis impossible. Presto can return results from those same queries in less than a second in most cases, allowing for interactive data exploration.

See also  Activate this “hidden” Facebook security feature right now to prevent hackers from taking over your ...

Not only is it highly scalable, but it’s also extensible, allowing you to build your own connector for any data source Presto does not already support. At a low level, Presto also supports a wide range of file types for query processing. Presto was open sourced by Meta and later donated to the Linux Foundation in September of 2019.

Here are some Presto resources for those who are new to the community:

What is PrestoCon?

PrestoCon is held annually in the Bay Area and hosted by the Linux Foundation. This year, the event takes place December 7-8 at the Computer History Museum. You can register here. Each year at PrestoCon, you can hear about the latest major evolutions of the platform, how different organizations use Presto and what plans the Technical Steering Committee has for Presto in the coming year.

Presto’s scalability is especially apparent as every year we hear from small startups, as well as industry leaders like Meta and Uber, who are using the Presto platform for different use cases, whether those are small or large. If you’re looking to contribute to open source, PrestoCon is a great opportunity for networking as well as hearing the vision that the Technical Steering Committee has for the project in the coming year.

Advertisement
free widgets for website

Explore what’s happening at PrestoCon 2022:

Where is Presto used?

Since its release in November of 2013, Presto has been used as an integral part of big data pipelines within Meta and other massive-scale companies, including Uber and Twitter.

The most common use case is connecting business intelligence tools to vast data sets within an organization. This enables crucial questions to be answered faster and data-driven decision-making can be more efficient.

How does Presto work?

First, a coordinator takes your statement and parses it into a query. The internal planner generates an optimized plan as a series of stages, which are further separated into tasks. Tasks are then assigned to workers to process in parallel.

Workers then use the relevant connector to pull data from the source.

Advertisement
free widgets for website

The output of each task is returned by the workers, until the stage is complete. The stage’s output is returned by the final worker towards the next stage, where another series of tasks must be executed.

The results of stages are combined, eventually returning the final result of the original statement to the coordinator, which then returns to the client.

How do I get involved?

To start using Presto, go to prestodb.io and click Get Started.

We would love for you to join the Presto Slack channel if you have any questions or need help. Visit the community page on the Presto website to see all the ways you can get involved and find other users and developers interested in Presto.

If you would like to contribute, go to the GitHub repository and read over the Contributors’ Guide.

Advertisement
free widgets for website

Where can I learn more?

To learn more about Presto, check out its website for installation guides, user guides, conference talks and samples.

Make sure you check out previous Presto talks, and attend the annual PrestoCon event if you are able to do so.

To learn more about Meta Open Source, visit our open source site, subscribe to our YouTube channel, or follow us on Twitter, Facebook and LinkedIn.

First seen at developers.facebook.com

Advertisement
free widgets for website
Continue Reading

Trending