Connect with us

FACEBOOK

Twitter will let you laugh soon with Facebook-like ‘reactions’

Published

on

Twitter may be up for a face-lift very soon!

Over the last few months, Twitter has been working on a range of new features – from monetised “Spaces”, to a paid model called “Twitter Blue” in the pipeline, the company is leaving no arena untouched.

Now, “Reactions” are making their way to the social networking platform.

According to developer Nima Owji, who has extrapolated the findings by a regular researcher in Twitterverse – Jane Manchun Wong, the new features are set to change how we consume Tweets.

In May, multiple portals reported that Twitter was working on “reactions” that would resemble the mechanism of how people react to content on iMessage and Facebook.

Advertisement
free widgets for website

What are Twitter Reactions?

The reactions on Twitter are set to represent an array of moods – from “sad”, “cheer”, “hmm”, to “haha”! Only “hmm” and “haha” were ready in May.

Now, Owji has discovered all the reactions. As is the case on Facebook and other portals that offer “reactions”, the user would be required to press and hold the like button for a while to react.

Also read: Twitter is working on a three-tier labelling mechanism to fight misinformation. Here’s how it’ll work

The feature is user-ready but there is still no clarity on when it would be rolled out to the masses.

Advertisement
free widgets for website

Developers and Twitter enthusiasts like Nima Owji and Jane Manchun Wong use reverse engineering to discover a fleet of upcoming features on Twitter every now and then.

Twitter’s slew of new features

The company is expected to roll out a diverse set of features which could alter how users interact with each other on Twitter.

See also  Hate speech content decreasing on Facebook, Instagram, says Meta

Spaces, a conversation driven feature will now allow users to make money. Twitter Blue is a paid model of Twitter which would enable users to escape ads and access a range of premium features.

Twitter is also working on a three-tier labelling mechanism to fight misinformation on the platform. “Get the latest,” “Stay Informed,” and “Misleading” are the labels known to developers and enthusiasts as of now.

Advertisement
free widgets for website

Also read: Japan is sending a shape-shifting miniature robot to the Moon

Recently, the company also revamped and restarted its verification programme.

These features could be rolled out soon, or perhaps never. But the clear indication is that Twitter is rethinking how users interact on its platform.

Advertisement
free widgets for website

Read More

Continue Reading
Advertisement free widgets for website
Click to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.

FACEBOOK

Updates to Section 7 of the Developer Policies – Facebook Gaming Policies

Published

on

By

updates-to-section-7-of-the-developer-policies-–-facebook-gaming-policies

We have updated Section 7 of the Developer Policies effective immediately. No change is required from the developers’ end, only awareness about these changes.

As part of our continuous focus on improving developers’ experience, we have made some updates to the Section 7 of the Developer Policies which covers all Facebook Gaming Products, such as Web Games on Facebook.com, Instant Games and Cloud Games. As part of this update we have removed outdated policies, and streamlined the language and structure of Section 7 to better reflect the existing state of our Facebook Gaming Products. We have also reorganized some policies under the Quality Guidelines. These updates do not introduce any product change, nor do they include any new requirements for developers.

Please review the updated Section 7 to familiarize yourself with the updated content structure.

First seen at developers.facebook.com

See also  Local Focus: Whāriki and Facebook join forces
Continue Reading

FACEBOOK

Creating Apps with App Use Cases

Published

on

By

creating-apps-with-app-use-cases

With the goal of making Meta’s app creation process easier for developers to create and customize their apps, we are announcing the rollout of an updated process using App Use Cases instead of the former product-focused process. App Use Cases will enable developers to quickly create apps by selecting the use case that best represents their reason for creating an app.

Currently, the product-focused app creation process requires developers to select an app type and individually request permission to API endpoints. After listening to feedback from developers saying this process was, at times, confusing and difficult to navigate, we’re updating our approach that’s based on App Use Cases. With App Use Cases, user permissions and features will be bundled with each use case so developers can now confidently select the right data access for their needs. This change sets developers up for success to create their app and navigate app review, ensuring they only get the exact data access they need to accomplish their goals.

Starting today Facebook Login will be the first use case to become available to developers. This will be the first of many use cases that will be built into the app creation process that will roll out continually in 2023. For more information please reference our Facebook Login documentation.

First seen at developers.facebook.com

See also  Follow the Pubs Code Adjudicator on Facebook
Continue Reading

FACEBOOK

Understanding Authorization Tokens and Access for the WhatsApp Business Platform

Published

on

By

understanding-authorization-tokens-and-access-for-the-whatsapp-business-platform

The WhatsApp Business Platform makes it easy to send WhatsApp messages to your customers and automate replies. Here, we’ll explore authentication using the Cloud API, hosted by Meta.

We’ll start with generating and using a temporary access token and then replace it with a permanent access token. This tutorial assumes you’re building a server-side application and won’t need additional steps to keep your WhatsApp application secrets securely stored.

Managing Access and Authorization Tokens

First, let’s review how to manage authorization tokens and safely access the API.

Prerequisites

Start by making sure you have a developer account on Meta for Developers. You’ll also need WhatsApp installed on a mobile device to send test messages to.

Creating an App

Before you can authenticate, you’ll need an application to authenticate you.

Advertisement
free widgets for website

Once you’re signed in, you see the Meta for Developers App Dashboard. Click Create App to get started.

Next, you’ll need to choose an app type. Choose Business.

After that, enter a display name for your application. If you have a business account to link to your app, select it. If not, don’t worry. The Meta for Developers platform creates a test business account you can use to experiment with the API. When done, click Create App.

Then, you’ll need to add products to your app. Scroll down until you see WhatsApp and click the Set up button:

Finally, choose an existing Meta Business Account or ask the platform to create a new one and click Continue:

Advertisement
free widgets for website

And with that, your app is created and ready to use. You’re automatically directed to the app’s dashboard.

Note that you have a temporary access token. For security reasons, the token expires in less than 24 hours. However, you can use it for now to test accessing the API. Later, we’ll cover how to generate a permanent access token that your server applications can use. Also, note your app’s phone number ID because you’ll need it soon.

See also  Can Facebook's $1 Billion Spend on Content Keep Creators Happy?

Click the dropdown under the To field, and then click Manage phone number list.

In the popup that appears, enter the phone number of a WhatsApp account to send test messages to.

Then, scroll further down the dashboard page and you’ll see an example curl call that looks similar to this:

Advertisement
free widgets for website
curl -i -X POST https://graph.facebook.com/v13.0//messages -H 'Authorization: Bearer ' -H 'Content-Type: application/json' -d '{ "messaging_product": "whatsapp", "to": "", "type": "template", "template": { "name": "hello_world", "language": { "code": "en_US" } } }'

Note that the Meta for Developers platform inserts your app’s phone number ID and access token instead of the and placeholders shown above. If you have curl installed, paste the command into your terminal and run it. You should receive a “hello world” message in WhatsApp on your test device.

If you’d prefer, you can convert the curl request into an HTTP request in your programming language by simply creating a POST request that sets the Authorization and Content-Type headers as shown above, including the JSON payload in the request body.

Since this post is about authentication, let’s focus on that. Notice that you’ve included your app’s access token in the Authorization header. For any request to the API, you must set the Authorization header to Bearer .

Remember that you must use your token instead of the placeholder. Using bearer tokens will be familiar if you’ve worked with JWT or OAuth2 tokens before. If you’ve never seen one before, a bearer token is essentially a random secret string that you, as the bearer of the token, can present to an API to prove you’re allowed to access it.

Failure to include this header causes the API to return a 401 Unauthorized response code.

Advertisement
free widgets for website

Creating a Permanent Access Token

Knowing that you need to use a bearer token in the Authorization header of an HTTP request is helpful, but it’s not enough. The only access token you’ve seen so far is temporary. Chances are that you want your app to access the API for more than 24 hours, so you need to generate a longer-lasting access token.

Fortunately, the Meta for Developers platform makes this easy. All you need to do is add a System User to your business account to obtain an access token you can use to continue accessing the API. To create a system user, do the following:

  • Go to Business Settings.

  • Select the business account your app is associated with.
  • Below Users, click System Users.
  • Click Add.
  • Name the system user, choose Admin as the user role, and click Create System User.
  • Select the whatsapp_business_messaging permission.
  • Click Generate New Token.
  • Copy and save your token.

Your access token is a random string of letters and numbers. Now, try re-running the earlier request using the token you just created instead of the temporary one:

curl -i -X POST https://graph.facebook.com/v13.0//messages -H 'Authorization: Bearer ' -H 'Content-Type: application/json' -d '{ "messaging_product": "whatsapp", "to": "", "type": "template", "template": { "name": "hello_world", "language": { "code": "en_US" } } }'

Your test device should receive a second hello message sent via the API.

Best Practices for Managing Access Tokens

It’s important to remember that you should never embed an App Access Token in a mobile or desktop application. These tokens are only for use in server-side applications that communicate with the API. Safeguard them the same way you would any other application secrets, like your database credentials, as anyone with your token has access to the API as your business.

If your application runs on a cloud services provider like AWS, Azure, GCP, or others, those platforms have tools to securely store app secrets. Alternatively there are freely-available secret stores like Vault or Conjur. While any of these options may work for you, it’s important to evaluate your options and choose what works best for your setup. At the very least, consider storing access tokens in environment variables and not in a database or a file where they’re easy to find during a data breach.

Advertisement
free widgets for website

Conclusion

In this post, you learned how to create a Meta for Developers app that leverages the WhatsApp Business Platform. You now know how the Cloud API’s bearer access tokens work, how to send an access token using an HTTP authorization header, and what happens if you send an invalid access token. You also understand the importance of keeping your access tokens safe since an access token allows an application to access a business’ WhatsApp messaging capabilities.

Why not try using the Cloud API, hosted by Meta if you’re considering building an app for your business to manage WhatsApp messaging? Now that you know how to obtain and use access tokens, you can use them to access any endpoint in the API.

First seen at developers.facebook.com

Continue Reading

Trending