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Nine strikes deals with Facebook, Google

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Nine has struck deals with tech giants Google and Facebook that will mean it gets paid for its news content. The media company announced the deals in a statement to the ASX on Tuesday. Facebook will pay Nine for news video clips and access to digital news articles on Facebook news products. The deal will initially last for up to three years. The parties have agreed on a minimum amount to be paid under the deal. Nine was reported to have inked a letter of intent with Facebook in March. Nine will supply news content to Google for its News Showcase and other news products. Under the five-year deal, Google will do more marketing across Nine’s platforms. Nine says the amount payable is a fixed annual fee with modest growth in the early years. Nine’s own newspapers The Sydney Morning Herald and The Age are reporting that the deals are worth hundreds of millions of dollars. The deals will help Nine’s publishing division boost its net income by $30 to $40 million in the coming financial year, the ASX statement says. The growth in earnings before interest, taxes, depreciation and amortisation is also aided by ongoing growth in subscriptions revenues for Nine’s mastheads. The deal comes after the News Media Bargaining Code came into effect in March. The code forced Facebook and Google to negotiate with news publishers to pay them for their journalism. Google remains in talks with a range of regional and smaller publishers. It signed a letter of intent with the ABC last week. More than 100 publications are already featured on its Showcase product. Facebook is still in negotiations with a range of other publishers. Australian Associated Press

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Nine has struck deals with tech giants Google and Facebook that will mean it gets paid for its news content.

The media company announced the deals in a statement to the ASX on Tuesday.

Facebook will pay Nine for news video clips and access to digital news articles on Facebook news products. The deal will initially last for up to three years.

The parties have agreed on a minimum amount to be paid under the deal.

Nine was reported to have inked a letter of intent with Facebook in March.

Nine will supply news content to Google for its News Showcase and other news products.

Under the five-year deal, Google will do more marketing across Nine’s platforms.

Nine says the amount payable is a fixed annual fee with modest growth in the early years.

Nine’s own newspapers The Sydney Morning Herald and The Age are reporting that the deals are worth hundreds of millions of dollars.

The deals will help Nine’s publishing division boost its net income by $30 to $40 million in the coming financial year, the ASX statement says.

The growth in earnings before interest, taxes, depreciation and amortisation is also aided by ongoing growth in subscriptions revenues for Nine’s mastheads.

The deal comes after the News Media Bargaining Code came into effect in March. The code forced Facebook and Google to negotiate with news publishers to pay them for their journalism.

Google remains in talks with a range of regional and smaller publishers.

It signed a letter of intent with the ABC last week.

More than 100 publications are already featured on its Showcase product.

Facebook is still in negotiations with a range of other publishers.

Australian Associated Press

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How To Lock Facebook Profile Via Desktop PC or Mobile App

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Facebook, one of the most popular social media apps, has recently launched a new safety feature for Indian users which allows them to lock their profile completely. The new feature allows users to keep a check on who is viewing their profile and make sure that only their friends can view their photos and posts. This new feature gives users more control over their Facebook experience. The feature has been launched in select countries only including India. 

Once the new feature is enabled then no one except your friends can zoom into, share or download your full-size profile picture or your cover photo. It restricts others from seeing posts on your timeline. Any posts that a user has shared publicly will change to friends. Only a small portion of the ‘About info’ will be visible to everyone on the profile.

To lock Facebook profile here is a step-by-step guide

1. First, you will need to update your Facebook app by heading over to the Google Play Store or Apple App store.


2. Go to your profile page. 


3. Next, go to ‘More’ under your profile name.


4. Click on the drop-down menu and look for the ‘Lock Profile’ option. Next, click it.


5. Next, you will receive a confirmation message on your screen.


6. Then click on ‘Lock Your Profile’ to lock your profile.

What happens once your Facebook profile is locked

Once your profile is locked, only limited details will be visible to people who are not your friends. Your friends will still be able to view the following.

– Any Pictures and posts on your profile.


– They will be able to view the cover photo or full profile picture.


– Stories will be visible to friends.


– Any new posts and pictures will be visible.

Apart from this, any posts users have shared in the past publicly will change to ‘Friends Only’ automatically. The Profile review and tag review will be turned on for users who lock their profile. Only a small portion of their About info will be visible to everyone on their profile.

How to Lock Facebook profile via mobile app

To lock your Facebook profile via the Android mobile app, follow the below-mentioned steps.

1. First, you need to go to your profile on the Facebook app


2. Next Tap the three-dot menu icon next to ‘Add to Story’ You will be able to see a Lock Profile option, tap on it.


3. The next page will give you a brief on how it works with an option to Lock Your Profile at the bottom, tap on it.


4. You should see a pop-up that says ‘You Locked Your Profile’, tap on OK

Here’s how to Lock Facebook profile via desktop

1. To lock your Facebook profile via desktop, head to https://www.facebook.com/


2. Open the profile icon in the URL, and replace ‘www’ with ‘m’ so it says ‘m.facebook.com/yourprofilename’


3. This takes you to the mobile version of Facebook on your desktop browser.


4. Next you will be able to see a three-dot menu next to the Edit Profile option.


5. In the three-dot menu, click on the Lock Profile option.


6. The next page shows how the locking works, and users get an option to Lock Your Profile at the bottom. Simply click on it.


Your profile is now locked.

How to disable posting on Facebook timeline

Only you and your friends can post on your Facebook profile. To stop your friends from posting on your Facebook profile follow the below-mentioned steps.

1. Click on the top right of Facebook


2. Choose Settings & Privacy, then click Settings.


3. Next In the left column, click Profile and Tagging.


4. Check for the setting ‘Who can post on your profile?


5. Then click the Edit option on the right corner.


6. Next from the dropdown menu choose the ‘Only Me’ option.

However, your friends will still be able to post comments on any post they can see on your profile like images that they are tagged in.

How to unlock your Facebook profile

To unlock your Facebook profile, the steps are the same for both the mobile app and desktop.

1. Where users could see the Lock Profile option earlier, they can now see an Unlock Profile option.

2. Now click on it and hit Unlock profile on the next screen.

3. You will be able to see information on how unlocking your profile works. There is an option to Unlock Your Profile at the bottom, simply click on it and your profile will be unlocked.

Unlocking the Facebook profile will allow all users to see your posts, pictures, etc. To maintain privacy users also have an option to control privacy through the Privacy settings. Here are some of the thing’s users can do to control who views your profile and other information.

1. They can use the Privacy check-up tool to ensure complete privacy of their profile.


2. Select who they share posts, pictures, as well as other information with.


3. Edit basic information and choose who can see it.


4. Users also have an option to change story privacy settings.


5. They can turn on Profile Review to control privacy.


6. Turn on the tag review option.


7. They have an option to Turn on Profile Picture Guard.


8. They can also use Control Who Can Friend and Follow You.


9. Keep a check and don’t make your email or mobile phone number public.

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Australia’s drug regulator may refer anti-vaccination Facebook posts to federal police

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Australia’s drug regulator is considering referring Covid vaccine misinformation posts to the federal police, after anti-vaccine campaigners targeted a Labor MP who posted about getting the jab.

In response to a viral post of Labor backbencher Julian Hill receiving his vaccine, numerous users posted false material purportedly from the Therapeutic Goods Administration wrongly claiming Covid-19 vaccines have caused more than 200 deaths.

The figure they used was in fact the number of people who have died after receiving the vaccine, but apart from one case, none have been linked by the TGA to the vaccine.

The TGA told Guardian Australia the alleged posting of the death counter was “particularly concerning” and it would consider referring it to the federal police.

Hill, who holds the outer Melbourne suburban seat of Bruce, has complained to the health minister, Greg Hunt, that the “serious misinformation” is spreading online “in the absence of a proper national public health campaign to combat misinformation”.

Hill posted a photo of himself being vaccinated on Saturday, reaching 500,000 users, and garnering 23,000 comments, 298 shares and more than 13,000 reactions.

According to the Auspol Posts Twitter account, which uses public data collated with online tool CrowdTangle, the photo had the most engagement of any Australian politician’s post on Facebook on 29 May.

In addition to replies wishing him well and expressing support for vaccination, many responded with an image citing the TGA’s weekly vaccine safety report for the incorrect claim there had been 210 “Covid-19 vaccine deaths” from 1 January to 23 May without mentioning most of these deaths were not caused by the vaccine.

“Apart from the single Australian case in which death was linked to [blood clots], Covid-19 vaccines have not been found to cause death,” the TGA safety report said.

More than three-quarters of the 210 deaths were in those aged over 75. “To date, the observed number of deaths reported after vaccination is actually less than the expected number of deaths,” it said.

The TGA said: “The alleged posting particularly of the false information of the death counter from ‘Covid-19 vaccines’ with the department’s and TGA’s apparent endorsement is particularly concerning.”

The TGA noted it is a criminal offence, punishable by two years in prison, to represent oneself as a commonwealth body or acting on behalf of one.

“The TGA will assess the information provided in the enquiry and refer the matter to the Australian federal police as an offence under the criminal code as appropriate.

“If evidence of a Facebook post is provided or found the TGA will also engage with Facebook.”

Several users also posted a letter from the TGA to a request for a document that provides “scientific factual evidence of the testing procedure being used in Australia that 100% positively identifies Covid-19 … in a living human, beyond any reasonable doubt”.

The letter states that no such documents exist, although point-of-care test kits for identifying Covid-19 were approved by the TGA.

Hill told Hunt he was “especially concerned about the large number of people purporting to share official information from the Australian government”.

“The lack of a national public health campaign to combat misinformation is extremely concerning.

“When the national government vacates the field, it leaves room for misinformation and conspiracy theories to flourish, especially online.”

Hill called for a “proactive effort to crowd out and call out the frankly batshit crazy stuff that is being spread”.

“Australians will continue to be exposed to restrictions and lockdowns … until enough of the population is fully vaccinated.”

In February, more than one-fifth of Australians said they “probably” or “definitely” won’t be vaccinated against coronavirus, with more recent polling putting the figure at one third, leading to concerns Australia will struggle to achieve herd immunity.

The federal government has set up a “myth-busting unit” to address what Hunt has called “plainly ridiculous” misinformation surrounding the rollout of the Covid-19 vaccine in Australia.

Hunt’s spokesman referred Guardian Australia to the “Is it true?” section of the health department’s website, and noted that Hill himself had provided links to it to debunk claims made about his vaccination photograph.

“As always, we suggest Australians get medical advice from medical experts, not Facebook,” he said.

The national Covid-19 vaccines campaign budget has a total budget of $40m over two years. Hunt’s spokesman cited ads running in all media since May, many containing “leading medical authorities” such as the TGA’s professor John Skerritt, chief nurse Alison McMillan and former deputy chief medical officer Dr Nick Coatsworth.

The government is planning a major advertising push to begin in July, to run on social media and traditional media, which is set to include celebrities, jokes and songs to entice younger Australians to get a jab.

The government has struggled with misinformation since newly independent MP Craig Kelly spruiked unproven Covid treatments while still a Liberal member of the government. Scott Morrison eventually distanced himself from Kelly’s comments after weeks of simply advising Australians not to get information from social media.

Kelly’s claims saw his popularity on Facebook soar, before the social media giant stepped in and deleted his page.

Before the Covid-19 pandemic, Facebook had come under fire for refusing to take down fake news about the “death tax” circulating during the May 2019 election.

Hill told Guardian Australia he hadn’t reported the issue of his vaccination photo to Facebook as he feared it would be “self-defeating” and result in the original photo being deleted, despite the fact it has “served a positive purpose in that numerous people have messaged seeking proper information and help”.

“I have reported or blocked some of the comments which hopefully Facebook will deal with, but it’s impossible to deal with a deluge of 14,000+ comments.”

Guardian Australia contacted Facebook for comment.

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Monday court round-up – Going wild in the aisles and a Facebook fall-out

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Crime doesn’t stop for a bank holiday…

Wild in the aisles

A woman has been locked up for attacking a Tesco employee after she was caught stealing cosmetics.

Lisa Ramsay also struggled with four police officers sent to arrest her at the Kingsway supermarket on Sunday.

The 32-year-old has now been remanded in custody ahead of sentencing at Dundee Sheriff Court.

Ramsay pled guilty to stealing cosmetics before assaulting staff member Stuart Scotland.

He had liquid thrown over him by Ramsay, who tried to kick him on the head and tried to strike him on the body with her elbow.

She also admitted using her nails to apply pressure.

Previous offender Ramsay, of Dunmore Street, Dundee, later struggled violently with four police officers.

Solicitor Theo Finlay said: “She has been self-medicating with Valium and the taking of Valium on this particular occasion is what has brought upon this behaviour.

“She is somebody with real and pressing difficulties in her life.”

Sheriff Lindsay Foulis deferred sentence on Ramsay until later this week for the case to call alongside other matters.

She was remanded in custody meantime.

Facebook fall-out

A Glenrothes woman punched her half-sister in the head over a Facebook post.

48-year-old Miriam Barowicz admitted to assaulting Ruth Gray in the street before pushing her to the ground.

Barowicz, of Canmore Road in Glenrothes, attacked her family member in the middle of the day in the town’s South Parks Road on March 16.

While walking in the street, Barowicz spotted Ms Gray walking her dog and lunged into a vicious attack.

She was ultimately disturbed when a pair of passers-by shouted at her to stop.

Days later, Barowicz was interviewed at Kirkcaldy police station and admitted to the attack.

At Kirkcaldy Sheriff Court, she pled guilty to striking Ms Gray with her fist and pushing her, causing her to fall over.

Her defence solicitor explained that a social media post published by Ms Gray “seems to have touched a nerve.”

The conviction was Barowicz’s first since getting in trouble in the Hamilton area in 2008.

Sheriff Kenneth Anderson instructed her to carry out 60 hours of unpaid work over the next year.

Alleged theft

A trial has been fixed for a man accused of stealing food, cash and boilers.

John Stewart is also charged with stealing boilers from a travellers site.

The 26-year-old allegedly broke into amenity buildings at two plots within the Dundee City Council-owned Balmuir Wood travellers site in Tealing on March 8 to steal a quantity of water boilers.

On Saturday, Stewart allegedly stole a box containing cash and food from East Scryne Cottages, Carnoustie.

Stewart, of Teviotdale Avenue, Dundee, pled not guilty when he appeared from custody at the city’s sheriff court.

Sheriff Lindsay Foulis fixed a trial for December at Forfar Sheriff Court and released Stewart on bail.

Prison drug supply

Reports have been ordered for a man who tried to flood HMP Perth with etizolam.

Scott Cameron pled guilty to attempting to be concerned in the supply of the Class C drug at the prison between May 14-16 2020.

The 29-year-old admitted the offence when he appeared from custody at Dundee Sheriff Court on Monday.

Cameron, of Aird Crescent, Kirkhill, Inverness, had sentence deferred for a social work report to be prepared.

The case will next call at Perth Sheriff Court in July. Cameron was released on bail.

Also…

A parrot-loving pensioner threatened to take an axe to his neighbour over concerns engine fumes from a classic car could harm his birds.

James Craig, 66, erupted just three weeks after his new neighbours moved in to his street.

Dennis Cox with a gun

Dennis Cox posing with a gun on social media.

A Dundee thug jailed for trying to murder his ex-partner has had his prison sentence extended for a frenzied assault on a fellow inmate.

Dennis Cox, who has more than 40 convictions, attacked Charles Anderson in a stairwell at HMP Perth in April last year.

In case you missed it…

Friday round-up — Police told to take a hike and lockdown boredom

Thursday round-up — £4 robbery and driving shunt

Wednesday round-up — Scotland ban and cannabis console

Tuesday round-up — Car spin and fraud claims

Gangster Granny: The rise and fall of Dundee’s most unlikely drugs baron

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