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The Importance of TikTok’s ‘97%’ Trend

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A new TikTok trend has emerged in light of Sarah Everard’s murder and the #MeToo movement. 

Data published on March 10 found 97% of women in the U.K. between the ages of 18 and 24 have experienced some form of sexual harassment in public. This includes cat-calling, excessive staring, being groped, receiving unsolicited suggestive content online and more. This shocking study, paired with the recent tragedy of the Everard’s murder in the U.K. while walking home, has propelled a trend for women to share the moment they became a part of the ‘97%.’ 

What’s even more shocking is the same study found that of the 97% of women that had an experience, more than 95% did not report it because they felt like it would not change anything. 

While the movement on TikTok started as women taking their power back and sharing their experience to show other women they are not alone, the movement’s backlash and counteractive “Not All Men” movement have flooded its comments. Let’s get one thing straight: it’s pretty obvious that not every single man is sexually harassing women. This “Not All Men” movement is not reassuring to women. In fact, it’s a slap in the face. It takes away from females speaking out on their experiences, and it belittles the clearly enormous issue at hand. 

Denial and stealing the spotlight from women’s stories does absolutely nothing for a progressing movement. While it’s common sense that not all men are predators, the question all men should be asking themselves in relation to this movement is, am I doing everything in my power to try and make women feel more comfortable? And, are my friends doing the same? Tolerance of this behavior is what prolongs the normalization and increases instances of sexual harassment. In conclusion, while it’s not all men, it’s nearly all women.

Amongst the “Not All Men” comments on TikTok, there are even more people heavily doubting the statistic, and some going so far as to discredit individual women’s stories. I’ve been following =Everard’s story and the ‘97%’ trend for a while now, but one woman’s TikTok and the comments she received particularly struck me. After sharing her incredibly difficult and powerful story, some men left comments doubting that someone would harass her because she was not personally appealing to them. That’s when the severity of the desensitized way we speak about women really hit me. I was infuriated and disgusted enough to ultimately write this article. 

Even in a place meant to highlight women’s experiences, there are comments equating her worth and validity with her appearance. These comments, attempting to discredit women, are actually proving the exact point this movement is making: hypersexualization and mistreatment of women is incredibly widespread and deserves the utmost attention. Why do people do this? Do they think it is funny, or does it make them feel better to negate that this is happening to this one individual woman? If their mother or sister told them the same story, would they so callously claim they were lying?

For the people that do not question the individual stories but do doubt the statistic’s legitimacy, the time to express that doubt is not now, and especially not on a victim’s TikTok page. While the study was conducted with a small focus group in the U.K. and, therefore, the statistic cannot be applicable to a worldwide percentage, the exact number should not invalidate the movement itself. Immediately after hearing women’s collective stories, if you find yourself searching for ways in which the statistic is wrong instead of asking for ways to help, you have completely missed the point. For some, scrambling to invalidate this statistic can serve as evidence of guilt and panic, and, for others, pure naivety and genuine disbelief. The outcome of both of these scenarios is the same: adding obstacles onto a long and rocky road women already have to face. 

So, if you’re reading this as a part of the ‘97%,’ I am incredibly sorry that your experience is somehow twisted to be the norm in today’s culture. I encourage all women, part of the 97% or not, to engage in whatever type of dialogue they can to raise awareness and unify in light of this movement. And, if you are reading this as a man, anyone who is not aware of the movement or someone who finds the need to question its validity, please ask how you can contribute to a better and safer world for women. 

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TIKTOK

The “Better Than Revenge” TikTok Trend, Explained

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Coming at us all the way from the depths of your 2010 CD collection is Taylor Swift’s song “Better Than Revenge,” which is currently spinning in the background of the new Better Than Revenge TikTok videos. It’s all part of some juicy, juicy social media drama, so if you’re in the mood, strap in.

As you probably know, Swift’s iconic lyrics go, “The story starts when it was hot and it was summer. And, I had it all. I had him right there where I wanted him. She came along, got him alone, and let’s hear the applause. She took him faster than you could say sabotage.”

Just like the song, the trend focuses on backstabbing and women who steal each other’s boyfriends. You typically see a montage of a happy couple in the videos, hugging, kissing, and smiling. And then, right as the lyric about sabotage drops, that’s when it becomes clear their story doesn’t end well.

At that point, the montage switches to photos of the poster’s now-ex with another woman. (Or it shows evidence that she was, in some way, involved in the breakup.) One of these videos sparked a Twitter debate between TikTokers Mads Lewis, Nessa Barrett, and Jaden Hossler after Lewis posted her own version.

According to Seventeen, the video showed images of Lewis’s relationship with Hossler before Barrett allegedly “took him faster than you can say sabotage.” She later deleted the video, calling it “immature,” but it had already made its way into the forever-files of the internet.

TikToker Indiana Massara shared a “Revenge” video as well, but hers is a little more ambiguous. The caption reads, “The way I could end them all with this challenge,” but she doesn’t say much else or explain who the “them” might be.

Massara’s fans have speculated that she’s alluding to her rumored ex-boyfriend Blake Gray and his new girlfriend Amelie Zilber. Did Zilber take Gray faster than you can say sabotage? The world may never know.

The trend gets shadier and shadier the deeper you go into the hashtag. And all it takes is one look at the comments section to see how many people love it, with some saying they’re all about “Messy TikTok.”

Again, as Lewis noted, it’s not the most mature way to call attention to an ex. In this instance, the confusion between her and Barrett — which went deeper than this particular TikTok video, according to Seventeen — appears to have caused Barrett and her boyfriend, Josh Richards, to go their separate ways.

But what else do you expect from lyrics that pit women against each other? “Better Than Revenge” is allegedly about actress Camille Belle, who dated Swift’s ex Joe Jonas in 2008. At the time, Swift was called out for slut-shaming due to the lyrics, “She’s not a saint, and she’s not what you think […] She’s better known for the things that she does on the mattress.”

Years later, in 2014, Swift did admit she’d gone overboard. She told The Guardian, “I was 18 when I wrote that. That’s the age you are when you think someone can actually take your boyfriend. Then you grow up and realize no one can take someone from you if they don’t want to leave.”

It’s precisely why you might want to stick to other versions of the trend, which feature dogs and babies “stealing” people away. Because if a puppy wants to stab you in the back and take your partner, they totally can — and they will.

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How to make a TikTok Duet (on Instagram, too)

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Angela Lang/CNET

If you’re on TikTok — or have seen TikTok videos reposted elsewhere — you’ve likely seen a Duet. Sometimes TikTok creators film videos specifically designed for other users on the app to add to. They can range from dances to singing songs or lip-syncing songs to viral challenges to blind reacts and more. 

Along with features like Stitch, TikTok Duets are another way for creators to interact with each other and for new TikTok-ers to get their foot in the “influencer door.” 

Read more: How to use TikTok: Make videos, go live, gain followers and maybe get famous

How to duet a video on TikTok

1. Download the TikTok app and make an account if you haven’t already.

2. Open the app and find a video you want to duet with. Sometimes creators will make videos specifically for someone to duet with. You might stumble across one in your main For You or Following feeds, but you can also search hashtags like #Duet, #DuetChallenge or #DuetWithMe. The video doesn’t have to be originally filmed to duet, though. 

3. Optional tip: Once you find a video, depending on what it is, you might want to “rehearse” a few times before recording. Don’t worry though, it’s not a one-take-only situation. 

4. After you find a video, tap the three-dot More icon in the bottom right of the video. 

5. Choose Duet (if Duet isn’t available, that means the creator turned it off in their own settings).

6. Start recording. 

7. When you’ve finished, add any special effects or edits and tap the checkmark. You can also add a few more effects after tapping the checkmark.

8. Tap Next after you’ve edited the video.

9. Before you publish, you can adjust your settings — allow or disallow comments, decide who can view the video and if others can duet or stitch with your video and add a description and additional hashtags.

10. Tap Post (or you can save to drafts for more editing).

Now you’re one step closer to TikTok fame (or at least a fun post for your own friends and followers). 

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Unless a creator adjusts it in settings, you can make a duet with their TikTok.


César Salza/CNET

Don’t use TikTok? Try Instagram’s Remix feature for duets

If you don’t have a TikTok account, social media app Instagram has its own take on the short video tool called Instagram Reels (here’s how to use Reels), as well as a new Duet-style feature called Remix. With the latest version of the app, you’ll be able to find Reels between Search and Instagram Shopping tabs at the bottom of the screen. 

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A look at Instagram Reels layout. 


Shelby Brown/CNET

Here’s how to Remix an Instagram Reel

1. Open the Instagram app. Download and make an account if you haven’t already.

2. Open the Reels tab and find a Reel you want to remix. 

3. Tap the three-dot More icon on your chosen Reel.

4. If Remix is available for you, choose the option Remix This Reel. 

5. From there, the interface works the same as making a Reel — the Reel you’re remixing will just be in the shot. Start filming and you can add music, edits and stickers. 

6. Tap next to watch and finalize any edits. Like TikTok, you can record and edit as much as you want. 

7. Tap next again, write in a caption, tag people and choose to add it as a Reel or to your Instagram Stories.

8. Tap Share or Save Draft.

For more TikTok tips and Instagram instructions, check out our tips on how to use TikTok and what might happen if Instagram for kids becomes a reality.

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TikTok Trends: How to Leverage Trending Content for Business : Social Media Examiner

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Do you want more exposure on TikTok? Wondering how to tap into trending TikTok content?

In this article, you’ll discover three ways to identify trending TikTok content and learn how to leverage trends to promote your business on TikTok.

TikTok Trends: How to Leverage Trending Content for Business featuring insights from Wave Wyld on the Social Media Marketing Podcast.
This article was co-created by Wave Wyld and Michael Stelzner. For more about Wave, scroll to Other Notes From This Episode at the end of this article.

Why Businesses Should Consider TikTok

The number-one reason anyone gets on TikTok is for the organic reach. No other platform offers that amount of visibility, which is particularly attractive to businesses.

The possibility of virality is exciting and can be life-changing. You’re probably familiar with the hugely popular video of TikTok user Doggface on his skateboard, chilling to Fleetwood Mac. He took a swig of cranberry juice, looked at the camera, lip-synced the lyrics, and went viral. TikTok loves real, authentic moments like that.

@420doggface208Morning vibe ##420souljahz ##ec ##feelinggood ##h2o ##cloud9 ##happyhippie ##worldpeace ##king ##peaceup ##merch ##tacos ##waterislife ##high ##morning ##710 ##cloud9♬ Dreams (2004 Remaster) – Fleetwood Mac

As a business on TikTok, though, you don’t need to go viral or have hundreds of thousands of followers to be successful. You just need the right followers. As with marketing on Instagram, you don’t need 10K followers and the Swipe-Up feature to make money. You just need to attract your ideal followers. The same applies to TikTok.

Let’s be honest, the algorithms on Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter aren’t designed to give you exposure. You’re lucky to have a small percentage of your followers ever see the content you post and the shelf life of content on these platforms is mere hours. But on TikTok, it’s totally different.

TikTok has publicly stated that your content has a shelf life of 90 days. You can have videos on the For You page (the main feed on TikTok) that are months old and still get comments, engagement, and followers from them.

The latest stats show that TikTok has approximately 80 million U.S. users. In the past year due to the pandemic, the platform’s demographics have shifted, so if you’re wondering if your target audience is on TikTok, they are. While the largest demographic age group is still 10 to 20 years, all ages are on the app.

You’ll also find a wide variety of communities on TikTok, ranging from moms, cosplayers, video gamers, and anime lovers to health and fitness, finance, book, and gardening-centric groups. Every community is there.

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How Leveraging TikTok Trends Can Help You Get More Exposure

TikTok is an app built on trends. As a business, leveraging trends allows you to show your personality, take advantage of the fun and entertaining side of the app, and get more exposure.

A trend is a common theme or music that’s in a video that people will repeat and generally put their own spin on. Trends are popular and fun, and it’s okay to do your own version of them. It’s not considered copying someone’s content like it would be on another platform.

TikTok isn’t just about showcasing your products or services, packaging videos, and showing the behind-the-scenes of your business. You need to relax a bit to connect with your audience. Having fun with TikTok trends shows people you don’t take yourself too seriously, which is a hallmark of the culture.

The best trends for businesses are the ones you can work into your niche. For example, one recent TikTok trend is the lean back trend. To create a video around this trend, you face the camera, look up, reach out your hand toward the camera, and lip-sync the lyrics. In the text, you say something about a situation or a problem.

Then cut to a side view of you leaning back, similar to a limbo style of movement. In the text, you reveal a punchline of how you overcame that problem or share something that didn’t let you get down. Any business—fitness, wellness, skincare, content creators, influencers, artists, and more—can incorporate a trend like this into their niche.

The TikTok algorithm doesn’t really curate trends. Instead, it shows users a mix of popular and less-popular videos in their feed that are curated to the type of content they engage with. So if you keep your trend video within your niche and put your own spin on it, you can get the right kind of eyeballs.

If you create a video based on a trend and people haven’t seen that trend before, they’ll watch it. And watch time is an important factor for your video performance. People need to watch your videos all the way to the end.

Trends are the fastest way for you to get more exposure on the platform but you’ll need to jump on those trends early if your goal is growth. Here’s how to find trends on TikTok and create a video based on a trend.

#1: Look for TikTok Trends Around Current Events

The first type of trend on TikTok is hot topics. These are trends based on popular current events. The day after the Super Bowl, there was a flood of posts of people reenacting the performance by the artist The Weeknd. When there was inclement weather in Texas this winter, many videos about that went viral.

To incorporate a hot topic into your TikTok marketing, you need to tie it to your brand, mission, or values. For example, on Inauguration Day, there were a lot of posts about celebrating the historic moment of the first female and person of color vice president. So if your business is about empowering women or has a target audience of women, you could easily take that hot topic and share some commentary on it.

#2: Check the Discover Page for TikTok Trends

Another type of TikTok trend is what you see on the Discover page. These are the curated trends that TikTok updates daily. They include trending hashtags, sounds, effects, and branded trends that businesses pay to have featured. For each of those trends, you can see how many videos have been made using that trend.

To access the Discover page, tap on the magnifying glass icon at the bottom of the screen.

Bear in mind that once a trend hits the Discover page, it’s already so popular and saturated that it probably won’t last longer than 3-4 more days. People are generally starting to get tired of watching videos based on the trends you see on this page, especially if they know what the punchline is or how the video’s going to end.

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While the trends on the Discover page don’t have a lot of staying power, they’re a great way to show your followers your personality, have a little fun, and participate in the culture of the app.

#3: Spot Up-and-Coming TikTok Trends

The third type of TikTok trend is up-and-coming trends. They might have only a few thousand videos based on them but have the potential to be really popular. As you might imagine, these trends are a little trickier to find but have the biggest potential for growth.

One of the challenges with trends on TikTok is that they don’t last long. They used to last about 7-10 days but now it’s more like 3-5 days before people get tired of seeing them on their For You page and just scroll past them. So you want to jump on these trends early before they hit the Discover page and become too saturated.

How do you spot an early trend?

Here’s the secret. Everyone’s For You page is curated based on the type of content they watch and engage with. So if you engage mainly with small business TikTok, your feed will reflect that. To spot early trends, you need to see a wider variety of content than just your niche.

The solution is to create a second empty TikTok account where you don’t engage with anything, follow anyone, or post anything. Just use it to scroll on the For You page. You’ll see different music, dances, and content creators that you wouldn’t see on your main account.

Scroll quickly through the feed and look for any repeating patterns with music, actions, or text in the video. If you hear a sound you haven’t heard before or see someone lip-syncing something that seems to have a theme, tap on the sound at the bottom of the video. This takes you to a page that lists the number of videos using that sound. You can see the original date and other videos using that sound ranked by popularity.

When Wave is looking for trends, she’ll use the data on this page to determine whether something might become popular. She’s looking for something that’s less than a week old and has been used in a decent amount of videos.

If the original date of the video is more than a week or two ago, that’s too old. If the sound has been used in 100,000+ videos, it’s probably past its sell-by date. But if it has 2,000 or 3,000 videos, it has the potential to get more popular in the next day or so.

If Wave sees a sound with potential, she’ll take a screenshot of the page and start tracking it. Sometimes, a certain sound will grow overnight by 3,000 videos, which tells her that people are liking it and it has the potential to go bigger.

Once you find a trend that could work for your account, the next step is to create your own TikTok video for that trend.

#4: Create a Video Based on a TikTok Trend

To get the best results from a trend video, you need to make it fit into your niche and brand and put your own stamp on it.

Don’t create trends where you just copy something, like a dance or lip sync to an audio because those trends rarely hit the Discover page. Nobody wants to watch you copy something, especially if they’ve seen it numerous times and know how it ends. You have to make it unique to you to find success.

For instance, one recent trend was called “everything you ever want,” which used a song from the movie The Greatest Showman. You’d lip-sync the lyrics but in the text, you’d share something you personally struggled with and overcame and leave it on an inspirational note. That was a perfect trend to make your own because you shared your story.

Another recent trend was the “I’m Bad” TikTok challenge with the Michael Jackson song “I’m Bad.” You’d do a bit of a dance, and then freeze the video and transition to a black and white photo of you doing the typical Michael Jackson move where you stand on your toes. Rather than simply mimicking the dance, you want to make it something unique to you.

How long it will take to create a trend video depends on what’s involved in the trend. If it’s a point-of-view joke, you might be able to do it in 5 minutes. But other trends require more time.

Let’s say you want to create a video based on The Fresh Prince of Bel-Air trend. To participate in this trend, you need to show a day in your life in 14 seconds, which is the length of the sound (the theme song). If you have lots of photos on hand that you could stitch together, it probably wouldn’t take long to create a video. But if you need to collect more video and photos, it might take you a day to make it.

Keep in mind that there’s no rule that says that you can only do a trend once. If your first video doesn’t perform as well as you’d hoped, try another version of it. Brainstorm other ideas and make multiple versions. Some people do a trend 10 times and maybe one will hit and go viral.

Generally, the reasons that trend videos flop is if you jump on the trend too late, don’t put your own spin on it, or don’t do it well. Some trends require clean transitions, or if they require the using an effect, you have to be good at using that effect.

If your trend video doesn’t work, should you delete it? Absolutely not. Wave doesn’t recommend deleting videos because there are rumors that the algorithm doesn’t like it when you delete your videos. It’s like telling TikTok that you don’t believe in your content. So if that’s true, you don’t want to risk getting an unhealthy account status from deleting videos.

As a final thought, remember that you don’t have to do every trend that shows up on the Discover page. Just choose trends that you have ideas for, can align with your brand, and are fun. Trends should only make up about 10% of your content. The rest of your TikTok content should be offering value and building trust and authority.

Wave Wyld is a TikTok expert who’s known as the “Queen of Trend Alerts.” She helps entrepreneurs get leads and make money by developing a loyal community on TikTok. She also offers group coaching and courses focused on TikTok. Connect with Wave on TikTok and check out her Facebook group, TikTok for Entrepreneurs, which includes a free course.

Other Notes From This Episode

What do you think? Are you inspired to make a trend video for your TikTok account? Share your thoughts in the comments below.

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