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Penn State Twitter Accounts That Deserve To Be Verified

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Ah, yes: the blue checkmark. It’s the ultimate sign of respect and power on Twitter and arguably the most highly coveted prize in today’s world.

Former Penn State football star Micah Parsons finally got verified on Twitter Tuesday, but that got us thinking…Are there other Penn State-related accounts that deserve the blue checkmark? The short answer is: absolutely.

With that in mind, we’ve picked out the top Nittany Lions on Twitter that deserve some recognition. Here’s our running list:

Micah Shrewsberry

Come on, folks. Penn State men’s basketball’s new head coach absolutely deserves the blue checkmark.

Coach Shrews’ Twitter game has already been red-hot out of the gates, as he’s managed to congratulate Penn State women’s soccer on its Big Ten regular-season championship, along with notes to Jeff Tambroni and Mark Pavlik on their 200th and 600th victories, respectively.

If Penn State hoops wants to get to the next level with a new coach at the helm, Shrewsberry needs to be verified on Twitter.

Paul Clifford

Can someone please explain to us why the CEO of the nation’s largest dues-paying alumni association isn’t verified on Twitter?

@Paul4PennState is constantly tweeting out love for Penn State and is one of the most active Twitter accounts out there. This past week, Clifford already got a huge W on the app when men’s soccer star Pierre Reedy followed him back, so let’s take it one step further and get the man a blue checkmark.

Yallah Taco

Like it or not, Yallah Taco is a State College staple. With that in mind, the taco joint absolutely deserves some more clout on social media. The restaurant’s account currently has just 33 followers, but you can change that!

Let’s get Yallah Taco some followers on Twitter and start its journey to the blue checkmark.

SOC 119 Class

Sam Richards’ race relations course is one of the most popular and widely taken courses at Penn State. Richards already packs 600 students into 100 Thomas twice a week every semester, and the class Twitter account has collected more than 2,000 followers.

The account is extremely active and shares clips from Richards’ lectures often, so there won’t be any problem there. SOC 119 lectures already garner viewers from around the world, so why not make the account verified?

Before class tomorrow, join Sam and his floating head and ask him ANYTHING!

Call 814-430-3555 with your thoughts.

During class, we will be joined by our #soc119 friends in Port-Au-Prince, Haiti. You won’t want to miss it! pic.twitter.com/PISXoBsMwp

— Soc 119 Class (@Soc119) March 29, 2021

JoePa Statue

“But Will, this account hasn’t tweeted since September 2019!”

I don’t care. Get the JoePa Statue verified. Also, if someone would please tell us where that bronze statue is, that’d be fantastic.

Old Main Bell

Sure, the Old Main bell chimes every 15 minutes, but it also has a Twitter account that does the same every hour.

There’s no arguing the importance of this account. It quite literally has tweeted every hour for as long as I can scroll back. That dedication must be recognized in the form of a blue checkmark.

Joe Patoasterno

Of all the Penn State Twitter accounts that have been mentioned so far, this may be at the top of the list. Joe Patoasterno quite simply makes “tuddie toast” with the Penn State logo on it and is a great follow for any Penn Stater.

Joe Patoasterno tweets and shares any and all things Penn State, including some great Penn State football commentary. At times, however, this account keeps it simple. It’s great nonetheless.

That’s blue checkmark material.

The Land-Grant Trophy

In case you forgot, the Land-Grant Trophy is the most beautiful trophy in all of college football. The magnificent hunk of wood is awarded to the winner of Penn State-Michigan State every year. And yes, it has a Twitter account.

Not only is the trophy beautiful, but it is truly hilarious on Twitter. Check out the last meme it fired off.

If you needed a reminder of how great this trophy and its Twitter account is, just check out this video. Watch it and tell me it doesn’t deserve to be verified.


Will Pegler

Will is a junior majoring in digital and print journalism and is an associate editor for Onward State. He is from Darien, Connecticut and is a lifelong Penn State football fan. He loves a good 80’s comedy movie, Peaky Blinders, The Office, and the New York Yankees and Giants. You can catch some of his ridiculous sports takes on his Twitter @gritdude and yell at him on his email [email protected]

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Kendrick Perkins trolls Twitter by joking about NBA return with the Nets

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The Heavy’s Brandon “Scoop B” Robinson posed an open question to NBA Twitter about the scenario the Brooklyn Nets are in right now – having an open roster spot and choosing who to give it to. When Robinson asked what position the Nets should target, Kendrick Perkins replied with a GIF of himself shooting from the elbow.

The purpose of Perkins’ tweet was to hint at Brooklyn picking him up and adding another center to the team. Of course the former big man was just joking; however, he may not wrong about the Nets picking up another center moving forward.

pic.twitter.com/YLa8dAQ3qI

— Kendrick Perkins (@KendrickPerkins) April 8, 2021

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How to catch employers’ attention on LinkedIn, Twitter and Instagram, according to 3 careers …

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  • Twitter and Instagram are platforms for your career as much as your personal life.
  • 3 experts share with Insider how to use them, compared with professional platform LinkedIn.
  • “My Twitter bio is incredibly clear on who I am and what I value.”
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

LinkedIn, Twitter and Instagram are not just about your personal activities: they can offer you huge exposure to employers, highlighting your career achievements.

While a resumé is tailored to a specific job application, social media can paint a wider picture of your life and work, giving “access to anyone to view at any time,” says career expert Helen Tupper.

Tupper is co-founder of the career development platform Amazing If. She has held leadership roles in companies such as Virgin and Microsoft, and has spoken at TedxLondon 2021 alongside her co-founder Sarah Davey, with whom she wrote “The Squiggly Career”, which topped the Sunday Times business bestsellers’ list. 

Insider asked her, as well as entrepreneur and coach Janine Esbrand, who founded career guidance service Lightbox Coaching, and Jessica Ross, a copywriter with 10 years experience in digital marketing and recruitment, to share tips on writing stellar social media bios to highlight your career.  

LinkedIn

“This is a key platform for your career,” Tupper says, adding that you should have a clear and current “About” section that references your strengths and passions. Update this section every few months, she adds.

Next, Tupper says people should seek recommendations from their network to build credibility and proactively give recommendations to others. 

“Be active on the platform. Create posts or write articles about areas you are passionate about and follow and engage with other people’s content on these topics too,” she says, stressing this can help build a brand and network beyond your immediate work sphere.

She adds that regularly sharing her own articles on LinkedIn has helped Tupper create an engaged community and “this community then helps to share my work with others.”

Esbrand says LikedIn headlines are prime real estate for a profile. “You should include the type of keywords your target reader would be searching for on LinkedIn, so that your profile can come up in search results,” she adds.

“On LinkedIn I was headhunted for my role as legal counsel at a start-up company. They were attracted to what I shared about coaching and professional development. I’ve had dozens of potential clients reach out to me after seeing my LinkedIn content.”

Ross says LinkedIn users should consider including not just their career history but any specific skills they’ve picked up elsewhere for their bio.

”You shouldn’t list every job you’ve had here,” she says. ”It’s important to have your core tone of voice in your bio. My own bio shares that I make a mean Pina Colada.”

Twitter

Twitter bios are limited to just 160 characters, far shorter than LinkedIn. 

As a result, you have to think more closely about the key things you want people to know about you. Tupper’s job role profile reads “Positive force for good (work)”, emphasizing her focus on helping people in their careers. “You can also use the banner image to communicate what’s important to you too,” she says.

What in particular has worked for her on Twitter? “Consistency (of Tweets). I share things that are connected to my focus on career development and I keep it professional rather than personal.”

Esbrand’s Twitter bio reads, “Helping mid-level female professionals change career direction and land dream roles l Career Coach l Executive Coach | TEDx Speaker.”

“I have found that my bio, which includes what I do and who I am passionate about helping, has led to people recommending me for opportunities they come across on Twitter,” she adds.

For Ross, it should be punchy to draw attention. “My Twitter bio is incredibly clear on who I am and what I value.” Hers reads: “Founder/Boss Lady. Freelance Marketer & Copywriter. Luxury Lifestyle Blogger. Gin Lover. Chocolate Aficionado. Band Obsessive.”

Instagram

Instagram bios are a similar length to Twitter bios

“It’s important to have consistency in what you’re saying about yourself on different platforms,” Tupper says. “Also think about whether there is an opportunity to link everyone back to a central point, for example, your Linkedin profile or your website.”

Tupper also advises creating different profiles for personal and professional purposes to help manage things. “My closed personal profile is for my family and friends and my open professional profile supports my career and personal brand,” she adds.

Esbrand says that when employers or clients consider hiring you, they may review your Instagram to get a feel for who you are outside work. 

In your bio, “you should describe the type of content you share and give people insight into who you are as a person,” she says.

“I have been hired by clients who were attracted to me because they resonated with my values and perspectives that were illustrated in my Instagram bio.”

Ross recommends putting a call to action in your Instagram bio, encouraging people to click on your website.

“The link in my bio leads to a page linking my marketing consultancy website, apparel design company and Clubhouse (audio-chat) rooms,” she adds.

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A room with a view: the Twitter account that spent a year staring into people’s homes

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With its stately lamp and verdant window view, Hillary Clinton’s “Zoom room” is nicer than most. So when Room Rater – a Twitter account which scores the video conference backgrounds of high-profile figures – gave it nine out of 10 last spring, Clinton took her disappointment to social media: “I’ll keep striving for that highest, hardest glass ceiling, the elusive 10/10,” she tweeted at the account.

Judging the backgrounds on video calls has been the armchair sport of the past year. As we doomscrolled through bleak statistics online, it was cheering to see shots of Meryl Streep’s sterile empty shelves or the copies of Fahrenheit 451 and The Twits awkwardly propped up behind Boris Johnson at a school in Leicestershire. Room Rater just happened to screengrab these moments. Scrolling through the posts a year after it launched in April 2020, these images are emblematic of just how quickly coronavirus forced all of us inside and online.

A year on, Room Rater is still going strong and now has almost 400k followers. It has slowed its output from about 40 rooms a day to four or five, but is now writing a guidebook of how to cultivate Zoom backgrounds for this “new reality”, says one of its co-founders, Claude Taylor. Some aspects of life are opening up, but many – particularly video conferencing – are here to stay. “People ask if we are going to shut down the account when everyone is vaccinated and the answer is no, because this is the new normal,” Taylor says.

Taylor created the account with his partner, Jessie Bahrey, in the early days of the pandemic. Taylor lives in Washington DC, Bahrey near Vancouver, and so, separated in lockdown, they would watch the news and judge the rooms of senators, some UK politicians, celebrities and “the punditry class” over the phone.

“The idea was to entertain at a time when we all needed that sort of diversion,” says Taylor. It quickly took off. Today, it’s standard practice for subjects, such as Clinton, to respond or even improve their backdrops at Room Rater’s behest. One very high-profile Republican senator was so miffed at getting a poor rating, their head of communications contacted the account to try to “re-pitch” the room to them.

Room Rater’s grading system is particular and partisan – if you’re an Obama or a liberal pundit, you’ll often score well. If you’re a Cruz or a Trump, you won’t. One Bernie Sanders appearance got a three, but the Vermont senator picked up a 10/10 for his much-memed inauguration look. There are points for good lighting, staircases and depth. Paintings are a big plus, as are books. Plants can bump a six to a nine, but too many can be seen as affectations.

Elsewhere, points are docked for bad lighting, bad angles and minor cord violations – headphones, chargers, anything that gives the game away. “You also need your camera at the right height. It just needs to be eye level. That’s the single most common mistake people make – no one wants the nostril view,” he says. The main issue with Hillary Clinton’s room was “her depth”, says Taylor. “You need to be the right distance from the background wall.” Clinton, it seems, was too close.

If Trump automatically gets zero, other celebrities are fair game. Lady Gaga’s ultra-minimalist backdrop scored her 2/10, while John Legend got 10/10 despite being largely blocked by a piano. Like Clinton, everyone seems to want to be rated. US pundits such as Steve Schmidt and John Heilemann are known for placing pineapple ornaments in shot to show they know they’re being watched by the account. (“I call the pineapples, ‘Room Rater calling cards’,” says Taylor).

Taylor runs the account on a six-year-old iPhone, doesn’t have a laptop and is today speaking via his partner’s tablet, which is propped up on a cat perch. Lined up behind him is a photoseries of the Italian towns of Portofino, Rome and Venice. He’s too close to the wall and the lighting is terrible. “We are not interior decorators,” says Taylor. “We just pretend to be on Twitter.”

The optics are key, but there’s a warm cattiness in the commentary. Occasionally, posts read like haikus. “Love the port wine posters. Sunflowers. Depth. Add pillow to left. 9/10,” says one. Sometimes, they’re more pragmatic: “Cozy room, warm colours, animal art, but could use an updated paint job on the green wall. 6/10”. Spiky entries loaded with expletives are reserved for Jordan Peterson’s clutter-laden den.

My own backdrop is disappointing. Peering into the screen, Taylor points out the earphones behind my head as a major cord violation. Having just moved flats, I have no art on the wall yet, but I remove the earphones and immediately go from a six to a seven. My daffodils get me an eight. With a framed piece, and “something of whimsy such as kid’s art”, I could be a nine. I prop up a postcard from my niece. “What most people are lacking to score well is a piece of art. If you’re on CNN for four minutes, just move the piece from the hallway”.

Bookcases have, of course, become the background of choice for anyone cultivating their self-image. Taylor says he sees a copy of Robert Caro’s The Power Broker on every fifth backdrop in Washington DC. And if you’re under 35 and a journalist, he says, you almost always own the book Caste: The Origins of Our Discontents.

They’re biased towards anything mid-century modern, and tolerate Ikea. “The only thing we avoid is colour-coded bookshelves as an aesthetic choice. We just don’t rate the room, so it’s become a way of avoiding us.”

Taylor’s political leanings bleed into his day-job running Mad Dog, a liberal political-action committee, and he is widely known for his anti-Trump output on social media and billboards. He used to be a “low level” White House staffer. “I did the political merchandising on Bill Clinton’s campaign. I was the chief of stuff,” he says. Bahrey, who is at work when we talk, manages a large-scale commercial greenhouse; big, meandering plants jump in and out of shot on the day we talk.

A self-appointed “luddite”, Taylor still understands the power of social media. A few months into the pandemic, Taylor and Bahrey used the account to raise funds from followers to buy surgical gloves and masks for hospitals in Bronx and Queens. Later, they did the same for Native American communities, who were among the hardest hit. They have produced Room Rater merch, the proceeds of which now go towards getting art supplies for kids not back at school.

“Twitter following allows you to do stuff, it just depends how you use it,” says Taylor. “But it’s also, you know, public and entertaining. What people exclude in their backdrops is as important as what they include. It’s a deliberate choice, what you show the world.” At a time when our homes must function as a place to live but also be presentable to the outside world, it’s heartening to see the rich and famous struggling under their laundry, too.

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